Thursday, 27 March 2014

AINA PHUTA NA NANI YAAD AJAEGI BETA............

                   MACHCHI SAMAJH RAHI HAI TANG PAKAD KAR KHINCH LEGI
                   USE PATA HI NAHEEN HAI YEH INSAAN WOH CHEEZ HAI
                   JIS KE DHOKE MAIN AANE SE SHAITAN BHI DARTA HAI

KITTE FAKHAR KI BAAT HAI NAI...........

YEH DEKHO ISKO KAHTE HAIN '' SKY DRIVE '' MATLAB ASMAN SE CHALANG LAGANA
DARNA NAHEEN GIRE TO DUBAI MAIN GIRTE  SAMANDAR MAIN BHI GIRE TO DUBAI KA

AINA PHUTA TO DHADAAM

                                  Under water bedroom : Poseidon Undersea Resort, Fiji.
KYA KYA KAREGA YEH INSAAN     AB PAANI KE ANDER JA BASA SHAITAN
UPAR WALE HI HAI BAHOT PARESHAN     KYA AB PANI MAIN BOMB LAGAEGA INSAAN

BEAUTIFUL ISLAND OF GREECE

YEH LO AB CATORAON MAIN SOINGE YEH LOG

                                                            WATER BED

WARNA WOH PAPA PAR CHILLAIGI


WARNA WOH PAPA PAR CHILLAIGI
MUMMY KAB AEGI YAAR

WOH FACEBOOK PAR BAITHI HAI

ABHI NAHI AEGI

KHANA TO MERE SAAT KHAE NA

JAO  BILLI KE SAAT  SWIMMING KARLO

MUMMY BECHARI KO DISTURB NAHI KARO
WARNA WOH PAPA PAR CHILLAIGI

HAN YAAR PAPA BHI DARTE HAIN

Wednesday, 26 March 2014

MUNH BUDDA HOJATA DEKHO AINA JAKAR


















MAMMA NE KAHA THA NA BADI BADI BATAIN MAT KARO 
MUNH BUDDA HOJATA DEKHO AINA JAKAR

HOW TO DISTINGUISH NATURAL HONEY

BENEFITS OF BARLEY GLASS


YEH LO AB PARINDE ZAMEEN PAR AUR YEH ..........


WOW ITNE SAARE PENGUINS


YEH DOSTI HUM NAHEEN TODAINGE..........

                                YEH DOSTI HUM NAHEEN TODAINGE
                                KISI KA HUM KHOON NAHI BAHAINGE
                                JODAINGE SAB KO HUM KISI KA DIL NAHI TODAINGE
                                MIL JUL KAR RAHNA INSAN KO HUM SIKHAINGE

HEALTH BENEFITS OF BARLEY

Barley is a wonderfully versatile cereal grain with a rich nutlike flavor and an appealing chewy, pasta-like consistency. Its appearance resembles wheat berries, although it is slightly lighter in color. Sprouted barley is naturally high in maltose, a sugar that serves as the basis for both malt syrup sweetener. When fermented, barley is used as an ingredient in beer and other alcoholic beverages.

Barley, hulled, dry
0.33 cup
(61.33 grams)
Calories: 217
GI: low

NutrientDRI/DV

 molybdenum59.9%

 manganese59.5%

 fiber42.4%

 selenium42%

 copper34.4%

 vitamin B133.3%

 chromium23.3%

 phosphorus23.1%

 magnesium20.3%

 vitamin B317.6%


This chart graphically details the %DV that a serving of Barley provides for each of the nutrients of which it is a good, very good, or excellent source .

Health Benefits

When the weather's cold, a big pot of soup simmering on the stove warms the heart as well as the hearth. Adding some whole grain barley to the pot will improve your health along with the flavor of whatever soup or stew you're cooking. In addition to its robust flavor, barley's claim to nutritional fame is based on its being a very good source of molybdenum, manganese, dietary fiber, and selenium, and a good source of copper, vitamin B1, chromium, phosphorus, magnesium, and niacin.


Barley's Fiber for Regularity, Lower Cholesterol, & Intestinal Protection

Wish you were more regular? Let barley give your intestinal health a boost. In addition to providing bulk and decreasing the transit time of fecal matter, thus decreasing the risk of colon cancer and hemorrhoids, barley's dietary fiber also provides food for the "friendly" bacteria in the large intestine. When these helpful bacteria ferment barley's insoluble fiber, they produce a short-chain fatty acid called butyric acid, which serves as the primary fuel for the cells of the large intestine and helps maintain a healthy colon. These helpful bacteria also create two other short-chain fatty acids, propionic and acetic acid, which are used as fuel by the cells of the liver and muscles.
The propionic acid produced from barley's insoluble fiber may also be partly responsible for the cholesterol-lowering properties of fiber. In animal studies, propionic acid has been shown to inhibit HMG-CoA reductase, an enzyme involved in the production of cholesterol by the liver. By lowering the activity of this enzyme, propionic acid helps lower blood cholesterol levels.
In addition, barley's dietary fiber is high in beta glucan, which helps to lower cholesterol by binding to bile acids and removing them from the body via the feces. Bile acids are compounds used to digest fat that are manufactured by the liver from cholesterol. When they are excreted along with barley's fiber, the liver must manufacture new bile acids and uses up more cholesterol, thus lowering the amount of cholesterol in circulation. Soluble fiber may also reduce the amount of cholesterol manufactured by the liver.
A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggests barley's fiber has multiple beneficial effects on cholesterol. In this study of 25 individuals with high cholesterol (postmenopausal women, premenopausal women, and men), adding barley to the American Heart Association Step 1 diet resulted in a significant lowering in total cholesterol in all subjects, plus their amount of large LDL and large and intermediate HDL fractions (which are considered less atherogenic) increased, and the smaller LDL and VLDL cholesterol (the most dangerous fractions) greatly decreased.
Lastly, when barley provides insoluble fibers that feed friendly bacteria in the digestive tract, this helps to maintain larger populations of friendly bacteria. In addition to producing the helpful short-chain fatty acids described above, friendly bacteria play an important protective role by crowding out pathogenic (disease-causing) bacteria and preventing them from surviving in the intestinal tract.
Barley's fiber can prevent or help with a number of different conditions. For example, when barley's fiber binds to and removes cholesterol-containing bile, this can be very beneficial for people struggling with heart disease since it forces the body to make more bile by breaking down cholesterol, thus lowering cholesterol levels.
A study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine confirms that eating high fiber foods, such as barley, helps prevent heart disease. Almost 10,000 American adults participated in this study and were followed for 19 years. People eating the most fiber, 21 grams per day, had 12% less coronary heart disease (CHD) and 11% less cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared to those eating the least, 5 grams daily. Those eating the most water-soluble dietary fiber fared even better with a 15% reduction in risk of CHD and a 10% risk reduction in CVD.
The fiber in barley can also help to prevent blood sugar levels from rising too high in people with diabetes.

Additional Protection Against Atherosclerosis

Yet another reason to increase your intake of barley is that, in addition to its fiber, barley is also a good source of niacin, a B vitamin that provides numerous protective actions against cardiovascular risk factors. Niacin can help reduce total cholesterol and lipoprotein (a) levels. (Lipoprotein (a) or Lp(a) is a molecule composed of protein and fat that is found in blood plasma and is very similar to LDL cholesterol, but is even more dangerous as it has an additional molecule of adhesive protein called apolioprotein (a), which renders Lp(a) more capable of attaching to blood vessel walls.)
Niacin may also help prevent free radicals from oxidizing LDL, which only becomes potentially harmful to blood vessel walls after oxidation. Lastly, niacin can help reduce platelet aggregation, the clumping together of platelets that can result in the formation of blood clots. One cup of barley will supply you with 14.2% of the daily value for niacin.

Significant Cardiovascular Benefits for Postmenopausal Women

Eating a serving of whole grains, such as barley, at least 6 times each week is a good idea, especially for postmenopausal women with high cholesterol, high blood pressure or other signs of cardiovascular disease (CVD).
A 3-year prospective study of over 220 postmenopausal women with CVD, published in the American Heart Journal, shows that those eating at least 6 servings of whole grains each week experienced both:
  • Slowed progression of atherosclerosis, the build-up of plaque that narrows the vessels through which blood flows, and
  • Less progression in stenosis, the narrowing of the diameter of arterial passageways.
The women's intake of fiber from fruits, vegetables and refined grains was not associated with a lessening in CVD progression.
The 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends at least 3 servings of whole-grain foods each day, but experts say most Americans eat less than a single serving. Don't be part of this majority! For delicious ideas that can help you enjoy whole grains as a daily part of your "Healthiest Way of Eating," see the "How to Enjoy" section below and take a look at the other World's Healthiest Foods ideas for whole grains by clicking buckwheat, corn, millet, quinoa, brown rice, rye, spelt, whole wheat.

Prevent Heart Failure with a Whole Grains Breakfast

Heart failure is the leading cause of hospitalization among the elderly in the United States. Success of drug treatment is only partial (ACE inhibitors and beta-blockers are typically used; no evidence has found statins safe or effective for heart failure), and its prognosis remains poor. Follow up of 2445 discharged hospital patients with heart failure revealed that 37.3% died during the first year, and 78.5% died within 5 years. Arch Intern Med. 2007 Mar 12;167(5):490-6.;Eur Heart J. 2006 Mar;27(6):641-3. Since consumption of whole grain products and dietary fiber has been shown to reduce the risk of high blood pressure and heart attack, Harvard researchers decided to look at the effects of cereal consumption on heart failure risk and followed 21,376 participants in the Physicians Health Study over a period of 19.6 years. After adjusting for confounding factors (age, smoking, alcohol consumption, vegetable consumption, use of vitamins, exercise, and history of heart disease), they found that men who simply enjoyed a daily morning bowl of whole grain (but not refined) cereal had a 29% lower risk of heart failure. Arch Intern Med. 2007 Oct 22;167(19):2080-5. Isn't your heart worth protecting, especially when the prescription—a morning bowl of hearty whole grains—is so delicious? For quick, easy, heart-healthy, whole grain recipes, click The World's Healthiest Foods, and look at the "How to Enjoy" section in any of our grain profiles.

Barley and Other Whole Grains Substantially Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

Barley and other whole grains are rich sources of magnesium, a mineral that acts as a co-factor for more than 300 enzymes, including enzymes involved in the body's use of glucose and insulin secretion.
The FDA permits foods that contain at least 51% whole grains by weight (and are also low in fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol) to display a health claim stating consumption is linked to lower risk of heart disease and certain cancers. Now, research suggests regular consumption of whole grains also reduces risk of type 2 diabetes. (van Dam RM, Hu FB, Diabetes Care).
In this 8-year trial, involving 41,186 particpants of the Black Women's Health Study, research data confirmed inverse associations between magnesium, calcium and major food sources in relation to type 2 diabetes that had already been reported in predominantly white populations.
Risk of type 2 diabetes was 31% lower in black women who frequently ate whole grains compared to those eating the least of these magnesium-rich foods. When the women's dietary intake of magnesium intake was considered by itself, a beneficial, but lesser—19%—reduction in risk of type 2 diabetes was found, indicating that whole grains offer special benefits in promoting healthy blood sugar control. Daily consumption of low-fat dairy foods was also helpful, lowering risk of type 2 diabetes by 13%. So, if you'd like to enjoy a hot bowl of barley for breakfast (an especially good idea—see immediately below), serve topped with low-fat milk.

A Better Breakfast Choice for Persons with Type 2 Diabetes

Barley may be an even better breakfast choice than oats for persons with Type 2 diabetes. In a study conducted by the Agricultural Research Service at the Diet and Human Performance Laboratory in Beltsville, MD, barley was much more effective in reducing both glucose and insulin responses than oats.
In this study, which involved 10 overweight women (mean age: 50 years, body mass index: 30), subjects ate a controlled diet for 2 days and were then given, in rotation, glucose alone and then 4 test meals in which 2/3 of the carbohydrate came first from oat flour then oatmeal, barley flour or barley flakes.
Glucose responses were reduced after test meals by both oats and barley, although more by barley (29-36% by oats and 59-65% by barley). Insulin responses after test meals were significantly reduced only by barley (44-56%). Interestingly, whether the oats or barley was consumed in the form of meal, flakes or flour had little effect. What seems to have been responsible for barley's significantly greater effectiveness in reducing both glucose and insulin responses is barley's soluble fiber content. The barley used in the study (a cultivar called Prowashonupana) contains more than 4 times the soluble fiber of common oats.

Cereal and Fruit Fiber Protective against Postmenopausal Breast Cancer

Results of a prospective study involving 51,823 postmenopausal women for an average of 8.3 years showed a 34% reduction in breast cancer risk for those consuming the most fruit fiber compared to those consuming the least. In addition, in the subgroup of women who had ever used hormone replacement, those consuming the most fiber, especially cereal fiber, had a 50% reduction in their risk of breast cancer compared to those consuming the least. Int J Cancer. 2008 Jan 15;122(2):403-12.
Fruits richest in fiber include apples, dates, figs, pears and prunes. When choosing a high fiber cereal, look for whole grain cereals as they supply the most bran (a mere 1/3rd cup of bran contains about 14 grams of fiber). With its rich, nutty flavor, barley makes a great breakfast alternative to a bowl of hot oatmeal. A mere quarter-cup of barley delivers one-quarter of the RDI for fiber!

Barley Can Help Prevent Gallstones

Eating foods high in insoluble fiber, such as barley, can help women avoid gallstones, shows a study published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology.
Studying the overall fiber intake and types of fiber consumed over a 16 year period by almost 70,000 women in the Nurses Health Study, researchers found that those consuming the most fiber overall (both soluble and insoluble) had a 13% lower risk of developing gallstones compared to women consuming the fewest fiber-rich foods.
Those eating the most foods rich in insoluble fiber gained even more protection against gallstones: a 17% lower risk compared to women eating the least. And the protection was dose-related; a 5-gram increase in insoluble fiber intake dropped risk dropped 10%.
How do foods rich in insoluble fiber help prevent gallstones? Researchers think insoluble fiber not only speeds intestinal transit time (how quickly food moves through the intestines), but reduces the secretion of bile acids (excessive amounts contribute to gallstone formation), increases insulin sensitivity and lowers triglycerides (blood fats). Abundant in all whole grains, insoluble fiber is also found in nuts and the edible skin of fruits and vegetables including tomatoes, cucumbers, many squash, apples, berries, and pears. In addition, beans provide insoluble as well as soluble fiber.

Whole Grains and Fish Highly Protective against Childhood Asthma

According to the American Lung Association, almost 20 million Americans suffer from asthma, which is reported to be responsible for over 14 million lost school days in children, and an annual economic cost of more than $16.1 billion.
Increasing consumption of whole grains and fish could reduce the risk of childhood asthma by about 50%, suggests the International Study on Allergy and Asthma in Childhood (Tabak C, Wijga AH, Thorax).
The researchers, from the Dutch National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Utrecht University, University Medical Center Groningen, used food frequency questionnaires completed by the parents of 598 Dutch children aged 8-13 years. They assessed the children's consumption of a range of foods including fish, fruits, vegetables, dairy and whole grain products. Data on asthma and wheezing were also assessed using medical tests as well as questionnaires.
While no association between asthma and intake of fruits, vegetables, and dairy products was found (a result at odds with other studies that have supported a link between antioxidant intake, particularly vitamins C and E, and asthma), the children's intake of both whole grains and fish was significantly linked to incidence of wheezing and current asthma.
In children with a low intake of fish and whole grains, the prevalence of wheezing was almost 20%, but was only 4.2% in children with a high intake of both foods. Low intake of fish and whole grains also correlated with a much higher incidence of current asthma (16.7%). compared to only a 2.8% incidence of current asthma among children with a high intake of both foods.
After adjusting results for possible confounding factors, such as the educational level of the mother, and total energy intake, high intakes of whole grains and fish were found to be associated with a 54 and 66% reduction in the probability of being asthmatic, respectively.
The probability of having asthma with bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), defined as having an increased sensitivity to factors that cause narrowing of the airways, was reduced by 72 and 88% when children had a high-intake of whole grains and fish, respectively.
Lead researcher, CoraTabak commented, "The rise in the prevalence of asthma in western societies may be related to changed dietary habits." We agree. The Standard American Diet is sorely deficient in the numerous anti-inflammatory compounds found in fish and whole grains, notably, the omega-3 fats supplied by cold water fish and the magnesium and vitamin E provided by whole grains. One caution: wheat may need to be avoided as it is a common food allergen associated with asthma.

Promote Optimal Health with Barley's Fiber and Selenium

For people worried about colon cancer risk, barley packs a double punch by providing the fiber needed to minimize the amount of time cancer-causing substances spend in contact with colon cells, plus being a very good source of selenium, which has been shown to reduce the risk of colon cancer significantly.
Selenium is an essential component of several major metabolic pathways, including thyroid hormone metabolism, antioxidant defense systems, and immune function. Accumulated evidence from prospective studies, intervention trials and studies on animal models of cancer has suggested a strong inverse correlation between selenium intake and cancer incidence. Several mechanisms have been suggested to explain the cancer-preventive activities of selenium. Selenium has been shown to induce DNA repair and synthesis in damaged cells, to inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells, and to induce their apoptosis, the self-destruct sequence the body uses to eliminate worn out or abnormal cells.
In addition, selenium is incorporated at the active site of many proteins, including glutathione peroxidase, which is particularly important for cancer protection. One of the body's most powerful antioxidant enzymes, glutathione peroxidase is used in the liver to detoxify a wide range of potentially harmful molecules. When levels of glutathione peroxidase are too low, these toxic molecules are not disarmed and wreak havoc on any cells with which they come in contact, damaging their cellular DNA and promoting the development of cancer cells.
Not only does selenium play a critical role in cancer prevention as a cofactor of glutathione peroxidase, selenium also works with vitamin E in numerous other vital antioxidant systems throughout the body. These powerful antioxidant actions make selenium helpful for the prevention not only of cancer, but also of heart disease, and for decreasing the symptoms of asthma and arthritis.
Phenolics, powerful antioxidants that work in multiple ways to prevent disease, are one major class of phytonutrients that have been widely studied. Included in this broad category are such compounds as quercetin, curcumin, ellagic acid, catechins, and many others that appear frequently in the health news. When Dr. Liu and his colleagues measured the relative amounts of phenolics, and whether they were present in bound or free form, in common fruits and vegetables like apples, red grapes, broccoli and spinach, they found that phenolics in the "free" form averaged 76% of the total number of phenolics in these foods. In whole grains, however, "free" phenolics accounted for less than 1% of the total, while the remaining 99% were in "bound" form.
In his presentation, Dr. Liu explained that because researchers have examined whole grains with the same process used to measure antioxidants in vegetables and fruits—looking for their content of "free" phenolics"—the amount and activity of antioxidants in whole grains has been vastly underestimated.
Despite the differences in fruits', vegetables' and whole grains' content of "free" and "bound" phenolics, the total antioxidant activity in all three types of whole foods is similar, according to Dr. Liu's research. His team measured the antioxidant activity of various foods, assigning each a rating based on a formula (micromoles of vitamin C equivalent per gram). Broccoli and spinach measured 80 and 81, respectively; apple and banana measured 98 and 65; and of the whole grains tested, corn measured 181, whole wheat 77, oats 75, and brown rice 56.
Dr. Liu's findings may help explain why studies have shown that populations eating diets high in fiber-rich whole grains consistently have lower risk for colon cancer, yet short-term clinical trials that have focused on fiber alone in lowering colon cancer risk, often to the point of giving subjects isolated fiber supplements, yield inconsistent results. The explanation is most likely that these studies have not taken into account the interactive effects of all the nutrients in whole grains—not just their fiber, but also their many phytonutrients.
As far as whole grains are concerned, Dr. Liu believes that the key to their powerful cancer-fighting potential is precisely their wholeness. A grain of whole wheat consists of three parts—its endosperm (starch), bran and germ. When wheat—or any whole grain—is refined, its bran and germ are removed. Although these two parts make up only 15-17% of the grain's weight, they contain 83% of its phenolics. Dr. Liu says his recent findings on the antioxidant content of whole grains reinforce the message that a variety of foods should be eaten good health. "Different plant foods have different phytochemicals," he said. "These substances go to different organs, tissues and cells, where they perform different functions. What your body needs to ward off disease is this synergistic effect—this teamwork—that is produced by eating a wide variety of plant foods, including whole grains."

Lignans Protect against Cancers and Heart Disease

One type of phytonutrient especially abundant in whole grains such as barley are plant lignans, which are converted by friendly flora in our intestines into mammalian lignans, including one called enterolactone that is thought to protect against breast and other hormone-dependent cancers as well as heart disease. In addition to whole grains, nuts, seeds and berries are rich sources of plant lignans, and vegetables, fruits, and beverages such as coffee, tea and wine also contain some. When blood levels of enterolactone were measured in over 800 postmenopausal women in a Danish study published in the Journal of Nutrition, women eating the most whole grains were found to have significantly higher blood levels of this protective lignan. Women who ate more cabbage and leafy vegetables also had higher enterolactone levels.

Fiber from Whole Grains and Fruit Protective against Breast Cancer

When researchers looked at how much fiber 35,972 participants in the UK Women's Cohort Study ate, they found a diet rich in fiber from whole grains, such as barley, and fruit offered significant protection against breast cancer for pre-menopausal women. (Cade JE, Burley VJ, et al., International Journal of Epidemiology).
Pre-menopausal women eating the most fiber (>30 grams daily) more than halved their risk of developing breast cancer, enjoying a 52% lower risk of breast cancer compared to women whose diets supplied the least fiber (<20 grams/day).
Fiber supplied by whole grains offered the most protection. Pre-menopausal women eating the most whole grain fiber (at least 13 g/day) had a 41% reduced risk of breast cancer, compared to those with the lowest whole grain fiber intake (4 g or less per day).
Fiber from fruit was also protective. Pre-menopausal women whose diets supplied the most fiber from fruit (at least 6 g/day) had a 29% reduced risk of breast cancer, compared to those with the lowest fruit fiber intake (2 g or less per day).
Practical Tip: As the following table shows, it's surprisingly easy to enjoy a healthy way of eating that delivers at least 13 grams of whole grain fiber and 6 grams of fiber from fruit each day.
FoodFiber Content in Grams
Oatmeal, 1 cup3.98
Whole wheat bread, 1 slice2
Whole wheat spaghetti, 1 cup6.3
Brown rice, 1 cup3.5
Barley, 1 cup13.6
Buckwheat, 1 cup4.54
Rye, 1/3 cup8.22
Corn, 1 cup4.6
Apple, 1 medium with skin5.0
Banana, 1 medium4.0
Blueberries, 1 cup3.92
Orange, 1 large4.42
Pear, 1 large5.02
Prunes, 1/4 cup3.02
Strawberries, 1 cup3.82
Raspberries, 1 cup8.36
*Fiber content can vary between brands.
Source: esha Research, Food Processor for Windows, Version 7.8

Barley's Copper Can Benefit Arthritis Sufferers

Copper, another trace mineral supplied by barley, may also be helpful in reducing the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. Copper is an essential cofactor of a key oxidative enzyme called superoxide dismutase. Superoxide dismutase disarms free radicals produced within the mitochondria (the energy production factories within our cells). Copper is also necessary for the activity of lysyl oxidase, an enzyme involved in cross-linking collagen and elastin, both of which provide the ground substance and flexibility in blood vessels, bones and joints. One cup of cooked barley provides 32.0% of the daily value for copper.

Development and Repair of Body Tissue

The phosphorus provided by barley plays a role in the structure of every cell in the body. In addition to its role in forming the mineral matrix of bone, phosphorus is an essential component of numerous other life-critical compounds including adenosine triphosphate or ATP, the molecule that is the energy currency of the body. Phosphorus is an important component of nucleic acids, the building blocks of the genetic code. In addition, the metabolism of lipids (fats) relies on phosphorus, and phosphorus is an essential component of lipid-containing structures such as cell membranes and nervous system structures. A cup of cooked barley will give you 23.0% of the daily value for phosphorus.

Meta-analysis Explains Whole Grains' Health Protective Benefits

In many studies, eating whole grains, such as barley, has been linked to protection against atherosclerosis, ischemic stroke, diabetes, insulin resistance, obesity, and premature death. A new study and accompanying editorial, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition explains the likely reasons behind these findings and recommends at least 3 servings of whole grains should be eaten daily.
Whole grains are concentrated sources of fiber. In this meta-analysis of 7 studies including more than 150,000 persons, those whose diets provided the highest dietary fiber intake had a 29% lower risk of cardiovascular disease compared to those with the lowest fiber intake.
But it's not just fiber's ability to serve as a bulking agent that is responsible for its beneficial effects as a component of whole grains. Wheat bran, for example, which constitutes 15% of most whole-grain wheat kernels but is virtually non-existent in refined wheat flour, is rich in minerals, antioxidants, lignans, and other phytonutrients:mdash;as well as in fiber.
In addition to the matrix of nutrients in their dietary fibers, the whole-grain arsenal includes a wide variety of additional nutrients and phytonutrients that reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Compounds in whole grains that have cholesterol-lowering effects include polyunsaturated fatty acids, oligosaccharides, plant sterols and stanols, and saponins.
Whole grains are also important dietary sources of water-soluble, fat-soluble, and insoluble antioxidants. The long list of cereal antioxidants includes vitamin E, tocotrieonols, selenium, phenolic acids, and phytic acid. These multifunctional antioxidants come in immediate-release to slow-release forms and thus are available throughout the gastrointestinal tract over a long period after being consumed.
The high antioxidant capacity of wheat bran, for example, is 20-fold that of refined wheat flour (endosperm). Although the role of antioxidant supplements in protecting against cardiovascular disease has been questioned, prospective population studies consistently suggest that when consumed in whole foods, antioxidants are associated with significant protection against cardiovascular disease. Because free radical damage to cholesterol appears to contribute significantly to the development of atherosclerosis, the broad range of antioxidant activities from the phytonutrients abundant in whole-grains is thought to play a strong role in their cardio-protective effects.
Like soybeans, whole grains are valuable sources of phytoestrogens, plant compounds that may affect blood cholesterol levels, blood vessel elasticity, bone metabolism, and many other cellular metabolic processes.
Whole grains are rich sources of lignans that are converted by the human gut to enterolactone and enterodiole. In studies of Finnish men, blood levels of enterolactone have been found to have an inverse relation not just to cardiovascular-related death, but to all causes of death, which suggests that the plant lignans in whole grains may play an important role in their protective effects.
Lower insulin levels may also contribute to the protective effects of whole grains. In many persons, the risks of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity are linked to insulin resistance. Higher intakes of whole grains are associated with increased sensitivity to insulin in population studies and clinical trials. Why? Because whole grains improve insulin sensitivity by lowering the glycemic index of the diet while increasing its content of fiber, magnesium, and vitamin E.
The whole kernel of truth: as part of your healthy way of eating, whole grains can significantly lower your risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity and type 2 diabetes. Enjoy at least 3 servings a day. No idea how to cook whole grains? Just look at the "How to Enjoy" section in our profiles of the whole grains, or for quick, easy, delicious recipes, click on this link to our Recipe Assistant and select whatever whole grain you would like to prepare.

Description

Barley is a wonderfully versatile cereal grain with a rich nutlike flavor and an appealing chewy, pasta-like consistency, the result of its gluten content. Its appearance resembles wheat berries, although it is slightly lighter in color. Sprouted barley is naturally high in maltose, a sugar that serves as the basis for both malt syrup sweetener and when fermented, as an ingredient in beer and other alcoholic beverages.
Barley can be found in the market in various different forms:
  • Hulled barley: Like the name suggests, the outermost hull of the grain is all that gets removed in this form of barley. While this makes for a chewier grain that requires more soaking and cooking, it also makes for a more nutritious food. Hulled barley is also sometimes called "dehulled barley," and it is the one form of barley what would be considered whole grain.
  • Pearl barley: Various degrees of polishing, or "pearling" take place in the production of pearl barley. In addition to a polishing off of the outermost hull, the grain's bran layer, and even parts of its inner endosperm layer, may be removed during the pearling process. In general, as you move from regular to medium to fine to baby pearl barley, you find increasing loss of nutrients. Pearl barley is much less chewy and quicker cooking than hulled barley, but it is also much lower in nutrients, and would not be considered whole grain.
  • Pot/scotch barley: In terms of processing, this form of barley falls in between hulled and pearl barley. It's been polished to remove its outer hull, but the polishing process is not continued for much longer, so that a large amount of the remaining grain is left intact. While pot barley would not technically be considered whole grain, and would lack some of the benefits of hulled barley, it is still a very reasonable nutritional choice and more nutrient dense than pearl barley. In many countries, pot barley is popular in soups - thus the origin of its name.
  • Barley flakes: Flattened and sliced, barley flakes are similar in shape to rolled oats. Barley flakes can be made from hulled, hulless, or pearl barley, and can be significantly different in nutrient content for this reason.
  • Barley grits: Barley that has been toasted and cracked, barley grits are similar in appearance to bulgar. Barley grits can be made from hulled, hulless, or pearl barley, and can be significantly different in nutrient content for this reason.
The Latin name for barley is Hordeum vulgare.

History

Barley originated in Ethiopia and Southeast Asia, where it has been cultivated for more than 10,000 years. Barley was used by ancient civilizations as a food for humans and animals, as well as to make alcoholic beverages; the first known recipe for barley wine dates back to 2800 BC in Babylonia. In addition, since ancient times, barley water has been used for various medicinal purposes.
Barley played an important role in ancient Greek culture as a staple bread-making grain as well as an important food for athletes, who attributed much of their strength to their barley-containing training diets. Roman athletes continued this tradition of honoring barley for the strength that it gave them. Gladiators were known as hordearii, which means "eaters of barley." Barley was also honored in ancient China as a symbol of male virility since the heads of barley are heavy and contain numerous seeds.
Since wheat was very expensive and not widely available in the Middle Ages, many Europeans at that time made bread from a combination of barley and rye. In the 16th century, the Spanish introduced barley to South America, while the English and Dutch settlers of the 17th century brought it with them to the United States.
Today, the largest commercial producers of barley are Canada, the United States, the Russian Federation, Germany, France and Spain.

How to Select and Store

Barley is generally available in its pearled, hulled and flaked form. It is available prepackaged as well as in bulk containers. Just as with any other food that you may purchase in the bulk section, make sure that the bins containing the barley are covered and that the store has a good product turnover so as to ensure its maximal freshness. Whether purchasing barley in bulk or in a packaged container, make sure that there is no evidence of moisture.
Store barley in a tightly covered glass container in a cool, dry place. Barley can also be stored in the refrigerator during periods of warmer weather.

Tips for Preparing and Cooking

Tips for Preparing Barley
Like all grains, before cooking barley, rinse it thoroughly under running water and then remove any dirt or debris that you may find. After rinsing, add one part barley to three and a half parts boiling water or broth. After the liquid has returned to a boil, turn down the heat, cover and simmer. Pearled barley should be simmered for about one hour, while hulled barley should be cooked for about 90 minutes.

How to Enjoy

A Few Quick Serving Ideas:
Mix barley flour with wheat flour to make breads and muffins that have a uniquely sweet and earthy taste.
Use cracked barley or barley flakes to make hot cereal.
Toss chilled cooked hulled barley with chopped vegetables and dressing to make a tasty cold salad.
Add barley to your favorite stews and soups to give them extra heartiness and flavor.
Combine cooked barley and healthy sautéed mushrooms for a pilaf with an Eastern European twist.
For some of our favorite recipes, click Recipes.

Individual Concerns

Barley and the Gluten Grains
Barley is a member of a non-scientifically established grain group traditionally called the "gluten grains." The idea of grouping certain grains together under the label "gluten grains" has come into question in recent years as technology has given food scientists a way to look more closely at the composition of grains. Some healthcare practitioners continue to group wheat, oats, barley and rye together under the heading of "gluten grains" and to ask for elimination of the entire group on a wheat-free diet. Other practitioners now treat wheat separately from these other grains, including barley, based on recent research. Wheat is unquestionably a more common source of food reactions than any of the other "gluten grains," including barley. Although you may initially want to eliminate barley from your meal planning if you are implementing a wheat-free diet, you will want to experiment at some point with re-introduction of this food. You may be able to take advantage of its diverse nutritional benefits without experiencing an adverse reaction. Individuals with wheat-related conditions like celiac sprue or gluten-sensitive enteropathies should consult with their healthcare practitioner before experimenting with any of the "gluten grains," including barley.

Nutritional Profile

Barley is a very good source of molybdenum, manganese, dietary fiber, and selenium. It also serves as a good source of the copper, vitamin B1, chromium, phosphorus, magnesium, and niacin.
For an in-depth nutritional profile click here: Barley.

In-Depth Nutritional Profile

In addition to the nutrients highlighted in our ratings chart, an in-depth nutritional profile for Barley is also available. This profile includes information on a full array of nutrients, including carbohydrates, sugar, soluble and insoluble fiber, sodium, vitamins, minerals, fatty acids, amino acids and more.

Introduction to Food Rating System Chart

In order to better help you identify foods that feature a high concentration of nutrients for the calories they contain, we created a Food Rating System. This system allows us to highlight the foods that are especially rich in particular nutrients. The following chart shows the nutrients for which this food is either an excellent, very good, or good source (below the chart you will find a table that explains these qualifications). If a nutrient is not listed in the chart, it does not necessarily mean that the food doesn't contain it. It simply means that the nutrient is not provided in a sufficient amount or concentration to meet our rating criteria. (To view this food's in-depth nutritional profile that includes values for dozens of nutrients - not just the ones rated as excellent, very good, or good - please use the link below the chart.) To read this chart accurately, you'll need to glance up in the top left corner where you will find the name of the food and the serving size we used to calculate the food's nutrient composition. This serving size will tell you how much of the food you need to eat to obtain the amount of nutrients found in the chart. Now, returning to the chart itself, you can look next to the nutrient name in order to find the nutrient amount it offers, the percent Daily Value (DV%) that this amount represents, the nutrient density that we calculated for this food and nutrient, and the rating we established in our rating system. For most of our nutrient ratings, we adopted the government standards for food labeling that are found in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's "Reference Values for Nutrition Labeling." 
Barley, hulled, dry
0.33 cup
61.33 grams
Calories: 217
GI: low
NutrientAmountDRI/DV
(%)
Nutrient
Density
World's Healthiest
Foods Rating
molybdenum26.99 mcg60.05.0very good
manganese1.19 mg59.54.9very good
fiber10.61 g42.43.5very good
selenium23.12 mcg42.03.5very good
copper0.31 mg34.42.9good
vitamin B10.40 mg33.32.8good
chromium8.16 mcg23.31.9good
phosphorus161.92 mg23.11.9good
magnesium81.57 mg20.41.7good
vitamin B32.82 mg17.61.5good
World's Healthiest
Foods Rating
Rule
excellent DRI/DV>=75% OR
Density>=7.6 AND DRI/DV>=10%
very good DRI/DV>=50% OR
Density>=3.4 AND DRI/DV>=5%
good DRI/DV>=25% OR
Density>=1.5 AND DRI/DV>=2.5%

Tuesday, 25 March 2014

YEH KYA LAI HAI.............

                                                                                     YEH APNE LIYE LAI HAI YA HAMARE LIYE

WOW HANDSOME GOAT


AB YEH SIKHAINGE KAISE DRESSUP HONA CHAHIYE

                                                         BEEKMAN NANNY GOAT

Sunday, 23 March 2014

ACHCHA HUA DEKH LIYE NAHEEN TO...........



BANANE WALE NE KYA KHOOB BANAYA HAI THE NASIR-UL-MULK MOSQUE IRAN



The Nasir-ul-Mulk Mosque, or Pink Mosque, stands in the middle of Shiraz, Iran and is one of the most beautiful buildings created by man. The mosque stands apart from any other architectural work of art on the planet.
Every day, when the sun hits the mosque, the whole building is flooded with a rainbow of color which will surely enchant anyone who visits it.


HEALTH BENEFITS OF OATS

Health Benefits of Oats

 

While the health benefits of oats are documented in hundreds of studies, we've listed just a sample here to indicate the power of oats to improve human health.

Oats May Reduce Asthma Risk in Children

While there is widespread belief that introducing solid foods to children too early may cause later health problems, a Finnish prospective study of 1293 children found that those introduced earlier to oats were in fact less likely to develop persistent asthma.
British Journal of Nutrition, January 2010; 103(2):266-73

Oats May Boost Nutrition Profile of Gluten-free Diets

Two recent studies out of Scandinavia show that adding oats to a gluten-free diet may enhance the nutritional values of the diets, particularly for vitamins and minerals, as well as increasing antioxidant levels.  Researchers asked 13 men and 18 women with Celiac disease to follow a gluten-free diet with the addition of kilned (stabilized) or unkilned oats.  After six months, the addition of stabilized oats resulted in an increased intake of vitamin B1 and magnesium, while the unkilned oats increased intakes of magnesium and zinc.  In the second study from Scandinavia, the addition of gluten-free oats allowed people on gluten-free diets to achieve their recommended daily intakes of fiber, as well as increasing levels of a particular antioxidant called bilirubin, which helps the body eliminate free radicals as well as protect the brain from oxidative damage.
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, January 2010; 64:62-67, doi:10.1038/ejcn.2009.113 and
The European e-Journal of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, December 2009; e315-e320

Oats Increase Appetite-Control Hormones

Australian researchers studied fourteen people who ate a control meal and three different cereals with different levels of oat beta glucan. They then collected blood samples for four hours after each meal, and found a significant dose response between higher levels of oat beta glucan and higher levels of Peptide Y-Y, a hormone associated with appetite control.
Nutrition Research, October 2009; 29(10):705-9

Oat Beta Glucans Improve Immune System Defenses

Italian researchers reviewed existing research about the positive effects of beta glucans on human health. They found that, in addition to reducing cholesterol and blunting glycemic and insulin response,  beta glucans boost defenses of the immune system agains bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites.
Minerva Medica, June 2009; 100(3):237-45

Oats Help Cut the Use of Laxatives

Laxative use, especially among the elderly in nursing homes, can lead to malnutrition and unwanted weight loss. Viennese researchers studied 30 frail nursing-home residents in a controlled, blind, intervention trial where 15 patients received 7-8g of oat bran per day. At the end of 6 weeks, 59% of the oat group had discontinued laxative use while maintaining body weight; the control group showed an 8% increase in laxative use and a decrease in body weight.
Journal of Nutrition, Health, and Aging, February 2009; 13(2):136-9

Oats May Help Reduce the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

Researchers in Mannheim, Germany carried out a dietary intervention with 14 patients who had uncontrolled type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. The patients were introduced to a diabetes-appropriate diet containing oatmeal during a short hospital stay, then examined again four weeks later. On average, patients achieved a 40% reduction in insulin dosage – and maintained the reduction even after 4 weeks on their own at home.
Experimental and Clinical Endocrinology & Diabetes, February 2008; 116(2):132-4

Oats May Improve Insulin Sensitivity

Researchers in Chicago carried out a randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial of ninety-seven men and women, in which half of the group consumed foods containing oat beta-glucan, while the other half ate control foods. At the end of the trial period, the oat group showed improvements in insulin sensitivity, while the control group was unchanged.
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, June 2007; 61(6):786-95

Oats Lower Bad Cholesterol

Researchers at Colorado State University randomly assigned thirty-six overweight middle-aged men to eat either an oat or wheat cereal daily for twelve weeks. At the end of the three-month period, the men eating the oat cereal had lower concentrations of small, dense LDL cholesterol (thought to be particularly dangerous) and lower LDL overall, compared to those in the wheat group, while their HDL (“good”) cholesterol was unchanged.
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, August 2002; 76(2):351-8

Oats Help Control Blood Pressure

Using a randomized, controlled parallel-group pilot study, researchers followed 18 hypertensive and hyperinsulemic men and women for six weeks, while half of them ate oat cereal (5.52g/day of beta-glucan) and the others ate a lower-fiber cereal (less than 1g total fiber). The oat group enjoyed a 7.5mm Hg reduction in systolic blood pressure and a 5.5 mm Hg reduction in diastolic blood pressure, while the wheat group was unchanged.
Journal of Family Practice, April 2002; 51(4):369

Oats #3 Overall, #1 for Breakfast, in Satiety Index

Also in Australia, researchers at the University of Sydney fed 38 different foods, one by one, to 11-13 different people, then asked them to report their “satiety” or fullness every 15 minutes for the next two hours. From this, they ranked all 38 foods in a “Satiety Index.” Oatmeal rated #3 overall for making people feel satisfied and full, and it rated #1 in the breakfast food group.
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, September 1995; 49(9): 675-90

Historic Health Observations

While the studies above are fairly recent, the health properties of oats have been recognized for centuries, as witnessed in the two excerpts below:
From the writings of German botanist Adam Lonitzer (1528-1586)
Oats are a useful grain for both cattle and man. Cooked and eaten it is an excellent medication encouraging one’s daily stool; it fills the belly and is a fortifying source of nutrition. Its particular virtue lies in penetrating the damp and consuming hardened ulcers; the flour of oats may be used as a poultice. It is exceedingly good for fistula. It may be consumed warm as a meal but used as a medication externally it should be cool and dry. Oats are good when used for all manner of swellings and pustules on the body that occur from heat. Wild oats, the stem, seeds and leaves steeped in red wine and drunk soothes both red and white effluvia from the belly and increases the function of the urethra, taking with it all refuse which hath collected in the bladder and womb.

From the writings of Italian herbalist Pietro Andrea Mathioli (1519-1603)
The effect of oats: the broth from the steeping of oats is good against coughs. Boiled and eaten, the gruel plugs stool. Against gall stones the common man is wont to heat oats or juniper berries and to place them in a poultice. Oats may be used on swollen or dislocated limbs, just as barley flour. Mixed with white lead and used to wash the countenance it makes a clear, attractive complexion. Against the mange and scabs of small children there is nothing better than to bathe them in steeped oats. 

[We were unable to find the original sources of the citations above (reprinted at www.avogel.ch) but have nonetheless included them here because we found them so intriguing! That said, we don't advise anyone to use white lead for a good complexion, and we're very glad that fistulas and mange are no longer common.]

Saturday, 22 March 2014

Health Benefits Of Drumsticks ,sojni ki phalli

Health Benefits Of Drumsticks

Many of us consult a diet nutrition in order to stay fit and healthy. Likewise, we spend a fortune on supplements assuming that they have the potential to provide all kind of benefits on our health. In the meanwhile, we forget the fact that there are many fruits and vegetables that we get in our kitchen garden or in the market which are low cost and equally beneficial for our health. It is imperative for us to understand the fact that instead of exploring for foods that are beyond our reach for good health. Include simple fruits and vegetables that you get in the market for a prosperous health.
 Drumstick, as we all know is also known as moringa oleifera or horseradish tree. It is a 'yard stick' for health, as it is known to be beneficial for the human health in one way or the other. This vegetable provides all kind of nutritional benefits and also cures many ailments. Drumstick, from its stems, leaves and seeds are known to have medicinal properties.
Health Benefits Of Drumsticks

Here are a few health benefits of drumsticks:

 Fights cold and flu

 Drumsticks are known to have a high content of Vitamin C. And if you are feeling low due to cold and sore throat, have drumstick soup to get relief instantly. Drumstick leaves are also known to have medicinal properties and is useful in treating asthma, wheezing and other respiratory problems.

 For strong bones 

The green vegetable has a high amount of iron, Vitamins and calcium. Drumsticks are known to provide strong and healthy bones and is said to purify the blood. Drumstick leaves especially are said to be the blood purifier. For better results have crushed drumstick leaves with milk.

Good for pregnant women 

Even pregnant women can get benefits from drumsticks. Including drumstick in daily diet will help pregnant women overcome the feeling of sluggishness, vomiting sensation and giddiness. It is also said to ease labour pain, and reduce post-delivery complications. Drumstick leaves are also used widely in India for lactating mothers to increase breast milk.

 Avoids infection 

Drumsticks have a high content of antibacterial properties and is beneficial in preventing infections in the throat, chest, and skin. Drumstick leaves and flowers are used in preparing soups as they are antibiotic in nature. It can also be used in treating fungal skin infections. 

 Cures from stomach ailments 

The leaves of drumstick is said to provide many medicinal properties. Having drumstick-leaf with honey and tender coconut water is known to be a wonderful remedy for curing stomach related ailments such as diarrhea, dysentery, jaundice, and cholera.
 These are the medicinal properties and the nutritional benefits of drumsticks. Include the green vegetable in your daily diet for a good health.

Friday, 21 March 2014

HEALTH BENEFITS OF AMLA

Health Benefits of Amla

Health Benefits of Amla
Health Benefits of Amla

Nutritional Benefits of Amla

Amla is a low calorie fruit. It provides only 60 calories for 100 grams of its intake. Amla contains mostly water which constitutes 80% of it. It is a rich source of carbohydrates and dietary fibre. It is one of the major providers of Vitamin-C and contains minerals like calcium, phosphorous and iron. Amla is also a rich source of antioxidants.

Health Benefits of Amla for Hair

Amla helps in maintaining proper health of hair. It makes them thick and soft. Amla is a source of Vitamin-C whose deficiency can lead to hair loss and hair breakage. Antioxidants prevent hair from premature aging and graying. Amla oil contains essential fatty acids that help in promoting hair growth. Head massage using amla oil increases blood circulation in the scalp thereby improving hair growth. It even helps in strengthening hair follicles and acts as a conditioner. Dandruff and dry itchy scalp can be avoided by applying it.

Amla promotes Digestion

Amla is a fibre rich fruit. It helps in healthy bowel movement and makes gastrointestinal tracts clean. Its bitter and sour taste triggers various taste receptors and makes the digestive enzymes active. These juices help in proper breaking of the food and make digestion efficient. It is known to neutralize acidity in the stomach and has a cooling effect.

Amla Benefits for Diabetes

Blood sugar level can be maintained by the consumption of amla. Low sugar and high fibre fruit are ideal for any diabetic patient. Antioxidants in it help in reducing glycosylated end product, serum level of creatinine and hiobarbituric acid-reactive substances levels which are oxidative. These are significantly reduced by amla consumption. Amla helps in regulating glucose in the blood and decreases albumin level in patients.

Amla improves Skin Health

Vitamin-C and antioxidants in amla makes it beneficial for skin health. It helps in reviving the skin texture and makes it smooth and glamorous. Vitamin-C helps in proper digestion thereby flushes out toxins from the body. This results in reducing skin blemishes and pigmentation and provides a rejuvenating and healthy skin. Acne and pimples can be avoided by its consumption. Antioxidants help in restricting the free radical damage to the skin and reduce the onset of aging and wrinkles. Amla is anti-viral and thus helps from harmful pathogenic diseases. Amla juice mixed with body oil and can be applied on the body to prevent diseases like eczema and psoriasis. Natural antioxidants present in it helps in healing these diseases.

Health Benefits of Amla – Reduces Cholesterol

Amla contains potent antioxidants like Vitamin-C, amino acids and pectin. Pectin helps in decreasing serum cholesterol in the blood and reduces LDL cholesterol concentration. Amla also helps in increasing HDL cholesterol which is beneficial to the body. Triglyceride and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels are significantly reduced by its consumption. Arteries and blood vessels are also protected from fat and plaque accumulation.

Amla Prevents Cancer

Amla is rich in antioxidants which help in restricting the growth of carcinogenic cells. It helps in keeping harmful free radicals at bay. Antioxidants in amla can even counterattack the side effects of anti-cancer drugs. Stomach, skin and liver cancer can be successfully prevented by its intake.

Health Benefits of Amla for Weight Loss

All the health conscious and obese people must add this fruit in their diet. Amla juice has been found to lower the fat content in the body. It helps in increasing the metabolism of food which leads to reduction of food accumulation in the body. Fat accumulation can generate toxins in the body. These toxins slow the digestion process and hence hamper the health of a person. Amla is a rich source of Vitamin-C which can flush down these toxins. It is most effective when consumed empty stomach in the morning.

Amla for Brain

Amla is rich in antioxidants and thus helps in keeping away the free radical damages. Vitamin-c present in it helps in the production of norepinephrine, a neurotransmitter that enhances mood and brain activity.

Amla lowers Blood Pressure

Polyphenols present in amla help in lowering the high blood pressure. It is most effective when consumed empty stomach in the morning.

Amla for Healthy Eyes

Amla is rich in antioxidants which help in protecting the retina from oxidative damages. Cataract and nearsightedness can be prevented by its consumption. It helps in relaxing the intraocular muscles. Age related macular degeneration can be avoided by its consumption.

Amla is Anti-inflammatory – Prevents Osteoporosis and Arthritis

Amla has anti-inflammatory properties. It can reduce pain and swelling and is helpful against diseases like arthritis. Eye swellings can be reduced by its consumption as it inhibits the damage caused by free radicals. Presence of anti-oxidants helps in making it an anti-inflammatory agent. Blood clots are also decreased, thereby helping in an efficient blood flow.
Vitamin-C helps in synthesizing the bones as it aids in the absorption of calcium. This makes amla helpful against osteoporosis.

Other Health Benefits Of Amla

  • Amla is a source of Vitamin-C which makes it a mighty medicine against cough and cold. Its intake can provide immunity to the body and helps in reducing flu and throat infection.
  • Amla can be helpful in preventing mouth ulcers. Rinsing with amla juice can reduce the occurrence of it.
  • Amla is a stress reliever and can help in inducing sound sleep.
  • Amla helps in improving memory and improves cognitive functions.
  •  It also aids in improving central nervous system of the body.
  • It aids in proper functioning of liver and urinary system.
  • Amla juice can be consumed to strengthen teeth and prevent bad odour.
  • It is a natural detoxifier and can aid in cleansing the liver and kidney.
  • It can be consumed by people having thyroid problems.
  • Amla juice can be consumed by men to prevent impotency and erectile dysfunction.

MERA BETU

                    DEEN O DUNYA MAIN NAAM RAOSHAN HOJAE

             HAR BURI NAZAR O HAR DUSHMAN DOOR HOJAE                                    
             NAMAAZ, ROZAH,TILAWAT KA TU PABAND HOJAE

      TERA BASERAH MADINAH ,ANA  JANA MACCA HOJAE

                ALLAH KE FAZL O KARAM SE TU GHAZI HOJAE

               EK MAA KI YEH DUA KHBOOL HAJAE  
                     
                                      AAMEEN YA ALLAH

Monday, 17 March 2014

KYA KHUDA KI SHAN HAI

                                              KYA KHUDA KI SHAN HAI 
                                              PANI PAR CHAL RAHI BEJAAN HAI
                                              LAKHAON TANAON WAZAN LIYE
                                              BADA PYARA NAZARA HAI
                                              KHUDA KI BANAI IS DUNYA KA


BANANA

Photo

WHITEN YOUR TEETH

Photo: BANANA PEEL